Recovery Research Hall of Fame

Hall of Fame

 

It is time to celebrate the lives of scientists who have moved beyond the study of addiction and addiction treatment into the frontier of addiction recovery research. Of particular note would be those scientists who have achieved a sustained focus on addiction recovery, conducted and published multiple studies in the field’s leading journals, and whose work has exerted a profound and positive influence on the design and delivery of addiction treatment and recovery support services. If there was a Recovery Research Hall of Fame, the following would be at the top of my list of nominees for induction (with apologies to those I may have overlooked in this review).

 

Drs. Douglas Anglin and Yih-Ing Hser, for their long-term studies of the course of addiction and their introduction of the concepts of addiction career and treatment career–all pointing the way to subsequent investigations into the subject of recovery careers.

Dr. David Best, for pioneering recovery research in the United Kingdom and Australia and co-developing the Assessment of Recovery Capital (ARC) scale.

Dr. Patrick Biernacki, for his studies of natural recovery from heroin addiction.

Dr. Thomasina Borkman, for her work on experiential knowledge, addiction recovery mutual aid societies, the social model of alcoholism recovery, and the critical distinctions between treatment planning and recovery planning.

Dr. Stephanie Brown, for her landmark studies on the recovery process of addiction-affected families.

Dr. Sandra Brown, for her work investigating post-treatment recovery outcomes of adolescents.

Dr. George Christo, for conducting the first studies of the effects of Narcotics Anonymous participation on long-term recovery outcomes.

Drs. William Cloud and Robert Granfield, for their studies of natural recovery from addiction and their introduction of the concept of recovery capital.

Dr. Gerard Connors, for his studies of Secular Organizations for Sobriety, linkage procedures to Alcoholics Anonymous, and the influence of spiritual orientation on addiction recovery.

Dr. John Cunningham, for his studies of natural recovery from alcohol problems.

Dr. Larry Davidson, for his pioneering studies of mental health recovery and the role of the recovery community center in promoting long-term recovery from substance use disorders.

Dr. Deborah Dawson, for investigating recovery prevalence and recovery rates within the major epidemiologic studies conducted in the United States.

Dr. George De Leon, for his pioneering studies of recovery outcomes following participation in traditional and modified therapeutic communities.

Dr. Robert DuPont, for his leadership in investigating recovery outcomes within Physician Health Programs (PHPs) and exploring the broader application of the PHP model to the U.S. addiction treatment system.

Drs. Andrew Finch, Kitty Harris, and H. Harrington Cleveland for conducting the first studies of recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs.

Dr. Michael Flaherty, for leading a landmark study on multiple pathways of long-term addiction recovery and his sustained advocacy for recovery research funding.

Dr. Marc Galanter, for his studies of Rational Recovery, Narcotics Anonymous, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the role of spirituality in addiction recovery.

Drs. Mark and Susan Godley, for their studies of the effects of post-treatment assertive continuing care on long-term adolescent recovery outcomes.

Dr. Christine Grella, for her studies of recovery outcomes among women/mothers with substance use disorders.

Dr. Keith Humphreys, for his numerous studies of Alcoholics Anonymous and Moderation Management and for his landmark book, Circles of Recovery.

Dr. Leonard Jason, Douglas Polcin, and Amy Mericle, for their studies of recovery residences and the effects of participation in indigenous recovery support institutions on long-term recovery outcomes.  

Dr. Lee Ann Kaskutas, for her studies of Women for Sobriety, Alcoholics Anonymous, Social Model Alcohol Programs, and her “What Is Recovery?” survey of the recovery community.

Dr. John Kelly, for his numerous studies of Alcoholics Anonymous and his founding of the Recovery Research Institute at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Elena Klaw, for her early studies of Moderation Management.

Dr. Alexandre Laudet, for her innumerable studies of addiction recovery and her advocacy for a comprehensive national recovery research agenda.

Dr. Richard Longabaugh, for his studies of the effects of social network support on recovery from alcohol use disorders.

Dr. Stephen Magura, for his studies of dual recovery support groups and mutual aid referral practices of addiction treatment and mental health professionals.

Dr. Alan Marlatt, for his pioneering work evaluating approaches to enhance long-term recovery stability.

Dr. Neil McKeganey, for his studies of addiction recovery in the UK.

Dr. James McKay, for his investigations into the effects of post-treatment continuing care on long-term recovery outcomes.

Dr. Thomas McLellan, for championing a chronic disease management approach to the treatment of addiction and leading efforts to develop a consensus definition of recovery for use in research and clinical practice.

Dr. Robert Meyers, for his studies of approaches to helping families affected by alcohol and other drug problems and the subsequent development of the Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) model of family support.  

Dr. William Miller, for innumerable treatment follow-up studies, his investigations into the process of “quantum change,” and his larger explorations of the role of spirituality in addiction recovery.

Dr. Rudolf Moos, for his studies of the effects of Alcoholics Anonymous participation on long-term outcomes following treatment for alcohol dependence and for illuminating the principles underlying the effects of recovery mutual aid participation.

Dr. Maria Pagano, for her innumerable studies of the effects of Alcoholics Anonymous participation on long-term recovery outcomes.

Lora Passetti, for her studies of adolescent recovery mutual aid participation and its effect on recovery outcomes.

Drs. James Prochaska and Carlo DiClemente, for their transtheoretical stages of change research. 

Dr. Jolene Sanders, for her studies on the experience of women within Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.

Dr. Kathleen K. Schutte, for her studies on successful remission of late-life drinking problems.

Drs. Christy Scott and Michael Dennis, for their studies on the long-term course of substance use disorders and the effects of recovery management checkups on long-term recovery outcomes.

Drs. Mark and Linda Sobell, for their studies on natural recovery from alcohol use disorders.

Dr. Christine Timko, for her studies of the effects of recovery mutual aid participation on long-term recovery outcomes.

Dr. J. Scott Tonigan, for his innumerable studies of of the effects of Alcoholics Anonymous participation on long-term recovery outcomes.

Dr. George Vaillant, for his groundbreaking study of long-term (60+ years) recovery from alcohol dependence.

Dr. Lee Garth Vigilant, for his studies on the effects of stigma on patients in methadone treatment and persons in medication-assisted recovery.

Dr. Joseph Westermeyer, for his cross-cultural studies on the role indigenous cultures play in the resolution of alcohol and other drug problems.

Dr. Charles Winick, for his early studies on maturing out of heroin addiction that stimulated subsequent research on the natural course of substance use disorders.

Dr. Jane Witbrodt, for her studies of Alcoholics Anonymous and the differences between abstinent and non-abstinent styles of remission from alcohol use disorders.

Dr. Sarah Zemore, for studies on the role of helping others in enhancing recovery stability and quality of life of the helper within recovery mutual aid fellowships.

Those wishing to explore the work of these distinguished scientists can find citations for their recovery studies by clicking here.