The celebration of multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery is a central tenet of the new addiction recovery advocacy movement. And yet if one listens carefully to the diversity of recovery stories rising from this movement, there is a striking and shared central thread that forms the connecting tissue across secular, spiritual, and religious(……)

The title “recovery coach” and the function of “recovery coaching” are being claimed by people of widely varying education, training, and experience. Though the roots of recovery coaching date to the early nineteenth century, the formalization of this role is a relatively recent development that flows from efforts to increase the recovery orientation of addiction(……)

Peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS) and the broader and more distinct arena of recovery coaching are growing exponentially in the United States and other countries. Peers, generally defined as people with lived experience of addiction recovery, are providing a wide variety of support services from initial outreach and engagement to long-term personal/family recovery support and doing(……)

The addiction recovery experience has been sliced and diced in all manner of categories: secular, spiritual, and religious; natural recovery, peer-assisted, and treatment-assisted; and abstinence-based, moderation-based, and medication-assisted, to name just a few.  Recovery achieved through any of these frameworks is often referred to as a pathway of recovery.  The growing consensus that there are(……)