In 2006, Bill Miller and I shared a book signing at a state addictions conference in Arizona. I had long considered Bill one of the true scholars and gentlemen of the addictions field—a man whose insight and productivity was matched only by his personal integrity. As we chatted about our current projects, he asked me(……)

Drug overdose deaths in the United States have risen exponentially due to sequenced drug surges: 1) prescription opioids, 2) heroin, 3) illicit fentanyl and related analogs, and 4) cocaine and methamphetamine—all used alone or in combination with other drugs. More than 66,000 American lives lost each year to drug overdose have sparked numerous initiatives ranging(……)

Non-clinical, peer-delivered recovery support services are being integrated into a wide variety of service settings, e.g., outreach programs of recovery community organizations, hospital emergency rooms, addiction treatment programs, recovery residences, collegiate recovery programs, and within the child welfare and criminal justice systems. Research to date on peer recovery support services suggest that such services are(……)

In the late 1990s, a recovery advocacy organization invited me to Dallas, Texas to talk about the history of addiction treatment and recovery in America. In responding to such requests, I often arrived early enough before my presentation to interview any old-timers I could locate about their early experiences in jails, treatment institutions, and mutual(……)

  …a movement is afoot that is seeking to put recovery in the wind so that it can penetrate even the most shadowed corners of the richest and poorest communities. The faces and voices of the individuals and families riding this wind are offering a simple but powerful testimony: “We are the evidence that addiction(……)