“Just because you are a character does not mean that you have character.” Wolf, Pulp Fiction“A man got to have a code.” Bunk/Omar, The WireWhat is the role of character reconstruction in addiction recovery? In recovery activism? I have repeatedly returned to these questions over the course of my adult life, especially as young recovery(……)

Public employees, including those working in municipal, state, and federal agencies responsible for planning and funding of alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention and treatment services, receive more than their fair share of criticism from multiple quarters, and work within these bureaucracies can be extremely frustrating at times. But, in these organizations, windows of opportunity(……)

One of the most fascinating chapters in the history of addiction treatment and recovery in the United States is that of the private addiction cure institutes that flourished in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ken Anderson, the founder of the international organization Harm Reduction, Abstinence, and Moderation Support (HAMS), has just published a(……)

A Historical Summit (Bill White)In 2001, more than 130 recovery advocates from more than 30 states gathered in Saint Paul, Minnesota at the invitation of the Johnson Institute’s Alliance Project and with support of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s (CSAT) Recovery Community Support Program (RCSP). That gathering marked the formal launch of a new(……)

Recovery advocacy, like any form of social activism, can exact a great personal toll. Some early nineteenth-century recovery advocates thrust themselves completely into the role of temperance missionary in the belief that such work would provide a pathway to personal recovery. Exhausting themselves in this role, they often succumbed again to addiction. Luther Benson, whose(……)