Is it possible we are seeing the rise of a new generation of scholar activists who combine the experiential knowledge of addiction recovery, academic excellence, and a desire to give back through recovery-focused research, writing, teaching, and advocacy activities? Over the past decade, I have interviewed many of the pioneers who made major contributions to(……)

There were many policy and service agendas that came out of the 2001 Recovery Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota—the formal launch of the new recovery advocacy movement in the U.S., but none more central than increasing recovery representation at the tables where decisions are made affecting the lives of addicted and recovering individuals and their(……)

Multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery are evident in the worldwide growth of secular, spiritual, and religious recovery mutual aid organizations as well as in the growing recognition of people achieving recovery outside of the frameworks of professional treatment and peer recovery support communities. Four U.S.-based organizations—Alcoholics Anonymous (181 countries), Narcotics Anonymous (132 countries),(……)

Fresh proposals to respond to rising opioid use/addiction/deaths arrive daily, but are striking in their collective silence on the needs of affected others—parents, siblings, intimate partners, children, extended family members, and social network members. Neglect of affected families has deep historical roots within the history of addiction treatment and recovery. Historically, family members were more(……)

Recovery from addiction through religious experience has a long history. In 2005, Dr. David Whiters and I published a paper on the historical roots of faith-based recovery in the United States, in which we reviewed abstinence-based religious and cultural revitalization movements within Native American tribes, the rise of nineteenth-century urban missions (e.g., the Salvation Army)(……)

The celebration of multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery is a central tenet of the new addiction recovery advocacy movement. And yet if one listens carefully to the diversity of recovery stories rising from this movement, there is a striking and shared central thread that forms the connecting tissue across secular, spiritual, and religious(……)

The title “recovery coach” and the function of “recovery coaching” are being claimed by people of widely varying education, training, and experience. Though the roots of recovery coaching date to the early nineteenth century, the formalization of this role is a relatively recent development that flows from efforts to increase the recovery orientation of addiction(……)

Peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS) and the broader and more distinct arena of recovery coaching are growing exponentially in the United States and other countries. Peers, generally defined as people with lived experience of addiction recovery, are providing a wide variety of support services from initial outreach and engagement to long-term personal/family recovery support and doing(……)

The addiction recovery experience has been sliced and diced in all manner of categories: secular, spiritual, and religious; natural recovery, peer-assisted, and treatment-assisted; and abstinence-based, moderation-based, and medication-assisted, to name just a few.  Recovery achieved through any of these frameworks is often referred to as a pathway of recovery.  The growing consensus that there are(……)