In 2006, Bill Miller and I shared a book signing at a state addictions conference in Arizona. I had long considered Bill one of the true scholars and gentlemen of the addictions field—a man whose insight and productivity was matched only by his personal integrity. As we chatted about our current projects, he asked me(……)

Addiction counseling has become an increasingly professional and pristine affair, and service relationships reflect a more detached process than in years gone by. And yet one worries about the loss of something precious in our current fixation on the technical mastery of evidence-based counseling practices. We would suggest that this endangered precious quality is captured(……)

The history of addiction treatment includes a pervasive and cautionary thread: the potential to do great harm in the name of help.  The technical term for such injury, iatrogenesis (physician-caused or treatment-caused illness), spans a broad range of professional actions that with the best of intentions resulted in harm to individuals and families seeking assistance.(……)

Addiction counseling has rich historical roots–spanning early Native American recovery advocacy leaders, 19th century temperance missionaries, reformed men working within early inebriate homes and asylums, lay alcoholism therapists, the “paraprofessional” counsels of the mid-twentieth century–all contributing to the birth and evolution of modern addiction counseling as a specialized profession.  It was the dream of Mel(……)