The title “recovery coach” and the function of “recovery coaching” are being claimed by people of widely varying education, training, and experience. Though the roots of recovery coaching date to the early nineteenth century, the formalization of this role is a relatively recent development that flows from efforts to increase the recovery orientation of addiction(……)

Peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS) and the broader and more distinct arena of recovery coaching are growing exponentially in the United States and other countries. Peers, generally defined as people with lived experience of addiction recovery, are providing a wide variety of support services from initial outreach and engagement to long-term personal/family recovery support and doing(……)

My 2009 monograph outlined in considerable detail the history, theory and status of peer recovery support services (PRSS) in the United States.  In the years since the monograph’s publication, voluntary and paid recovery support services have dramatically increased in the US and internationally.  Such growth has recently prompted me to reflect on the pre-professional days(……)

In 2001, more than 100 representatives of newly rising recovery advocacy organizations participated in a recovery summit in St. Paul, Minnesota to lay the foundation for a national recovery advocacy movement.  Visions of changing the world flourished amidst the practical details of forging what would become Faces and Voices of Recovery, but even the most(……)

For more than 150 years, specialized support for addiction recovery in the United States has rested in two cultural institutions: peer-based recovery mutual aid organizations and professionally-directed addiction treatment.  Recovery historians are noting something quite unique unfolding in recent decades:  the emergence of new recovery support institutions that do not fit the categories of traditional(……)