There were many policy and service agendas that came out of the 2001 Recovery Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota—the formal launch of the new recovery advocacy movement in the U.S., but none more central than increasing recovery representation at the tables where decisions are made affecting the lives of addicted and recovering individuals and their(……)

The culture of recovery in the United States is recognized in popular and professional consciousness through its increasingly elaborate tribal organization. For more than 150 years, individuals seeking mutual support for the resolution of alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems have organized themselves into closed societies.  Recovery mutual aid societies today span an ever-growing menu(……)