“Just because you are a character does not mean that you have character.” Wolf, Pulp Fiction“A man got to have a code.” Bunk/Omar, The WireWhat is the role of character reconstruction in addiction recovery? In recovery activism? I have repeatedly returned to these questions over the course of my adult life, especially as young recovery(……)

Public employees, including those working in municipal, state, and federal agencies responsible for planning and funding of alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention and treatment services, receive more than their fair share of criticism from multiple quarters, and work within these bureaucracies can be extremely frustrating at times. But, in these organizations, windows of opportunity(……)

A Historical Summit (Bill White)In 2001, more than 130 recovery advocates from more than 30 states gathered in Saint Paul, Minnesota at the invitation of the Johnson Institute’s Alliance Project and with support of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s (CSAT) Recovery Community Support Program (RCSP). That gathering marked the formal launch of a new(……)

 Remarks of William WhiteFloridians For Recovery 2021 Summit I regret that recent health challenges prevent me from joining you today in person but I am grateful for the opportunity to pass along some brief reflections on recovery leadership.As new recovery community organizations (RCOs) linked themselves into a national advocacy movement in the late 1990s, we were(……)

He who shows himself at every place will someday look for a place to hide. –African ProverbEarlier blogs in this series explored the benefits and limitations of public recovery disclosure, the potential risks to multiple parties involved in such disclosure, and the ethics of recovery disclosure. In this final blog in the series, we explore(……)

Ethics involves the application of moral principles to promote good and prevent harm. Ethical decision-making within our service and advocacy activities is an assessment of the ratio of potential benefits to potential harms in any course of action—with a particular emphasis on “first do no harm.”Such decision-making involves asking ourselves three questions. First, what parties(……)

A central goal of public recovery self-disclosure is to challenge myths and misconceptions about addiction and recovery through the elements of our personal stories. Recovery advocates must avoid contributing to false narratives by having selective parts of our stories appropriated while ignoring the central recovery message.Addiction/treatment/recovery-related social stigma and its untoward consequences rests on old(……)

The first blog in this series explored the value and limitations of recovery storytelling as an anti-stigma strategy. We suggested that public storytelling is best wedded to larger recovery community inclusive strategies that move beyond the goal of changing personal attitudes to the larger goal of dismantling the institutional machinery that perpetuates stigma and discrimination.(……)