In their classic 1992 text, The Spirituality of Imperfection, Ernie Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham described six dimensions of spirituality at the core of the recovery experience: release, gratitude, humility, tolerance, forgiveness, and being-at-home. In my prolonged mentorship by and collaborations with Ernie, we often returned to those central themes. The essence of the addiction experience(……)

  I rarely post guest blogs on this website, but occasionally I run across a piece of writing that strikes me as important to share with my readers. The short essay below was written by Erik Haines and offers insight into the growth of the recovery advocacy movement in Canada. It is posted here as(……)

The stigma attached to addiction, addiction treatment, and even addiction recovery is extended professionally and socially to those who choose to work in the addictions arena. Erving Goffman, the premier stigma theorist, referred to this as courtesy stigma—discredit extended to families and others closely linked to people with addiction disorders. It is common for addiction(……)

International headlines abound of the harsh drug policies and killing of addicted people in the Philippines, but the prevailing mantra of the international recovery advocacy movement—recovery by any means necessary under any circumstances—is nowhere more evident than in the Philippines. There is, in fact, a rising recovery advocacy movement in the Philippines mobilizing people in recovery,(……)

In January 2000, Dr. Alex DeLuca, then the long-tenured Director of the Smithers Addiction Treatment and Research Center, provided permission for the local Moderation Management (MM) group to hold weekly MM meetings at the Smithers facility. Following the publication of newspaper articles in July that conveyed the impression that the Smithers Center had abandoned its(……)

In 2011, Ernie Kurtz and I began a sustained meditation on the role of self in recovery. This was an extension of our earlier work on the “varieties of recovery experience” and was stimulated by a recovery research project led by Dr. Mike Flaherty. The project involved using in-depth interviews to compare and contrast people(……)

A significant portion of people who resolve alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems do not embrace a recovery identity—do not see themselves as recovered, recovering, or in recovery. I first suggested this in Pathways from the Culture of Addiction to the Culture Recovery (1990) and later in a co-authored essay on the varieties of recovery(……)

In 1987, I celebrated 20 years working in the addictions field. During those years, I perceived myself as a laborer rather than a “leader,” but an incident occurred in fall of 1987 that forced me to confront the role that was emerging for me. The incident in question involved the issue of smoking. Like most(……)

One of the distinctive features of the recovery advocacy movement is its commitment to transcend the historical barriers that have separated people within the United States and across the world. I have been particularly moved by the growth of recovery community organizations around the globe. In the U.S., early RCOs within African American communities and within(……)