Members of historically disempowered and stigmatized groups (e.g., women, people of color, members of the LGBT community, religious minorities, etc.) have long been subjected to overt aggression from the dominant cultures in which they are nested. Such aggression in the United States has encompassed genocidal campaigns (e.g., the “Indian Wars”), forced sequestration (e.g., Japanese-American encampment(……)

Successful social movements permeate key areas of cultural life, as is evidenced by the pervasive and enduring influence of the civil rights, women’s, disability, and LGBT rights movements in the United States. The new recovery advocacy movement has similarly sought to extend its influence beyond social policy, addiction treatment, and recovery support service arenas. Like(……)

In April of this year, Don Coyhis, leader of the Native American Wellbriety Movement, and I penned a communication to the field entitled Intergenerational Healing: Recognition, Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery. In that communication, we suggested that: 1) addiction in oppressed communities was fed by historical trauma and its residual remnants within contemporary life, and 2)(……)

Is it possible we are seeing the rise of a new generation of scholar activists who combine the experiential knowledge of addiction recovery, academic excellence, and a desire to give back through recovery-focused research, writing, teaching, and advocacy activities? Over the past decade, I have interviewed many of the pioneers who made major contributions to(……)

There were many policy and service agendas that came out of the 2001 Recovery Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota—the formal launch of the new recovery advocacy movement in the U.S., but none more central than increasing recovery representation at the tables where decisions are made affecting the lives of addicted and recovering individuals and their(……)

Multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery are evident in the worldwide growth of secular, spiritual, and religious recovery mutual aid organizations as well as in the growing recognition of people achieving recovery outside of the frameworks of professional treatment and peer recovery support communities. Four U.S.-based organizations—Alcoholics Anonymous (181 countries), Narcotics Anonymous (132 countries),(……)

Fresh proposals to respond to rising opioid use/addiction/deaths arrive daily, but are striking in their collective silence on the needs of affected others—parents, siblings, intimate partners, children, extended family members, and social network members. Neglect of affected families has deep historical roots within the history of addiction treatment and recovery. Historically, family members were more(……)

Recovery from addiction through religious experience has a long history. In 2005, Dr. David Whiters and I published a paper on the historical roots of faith-based recovery in the United States, in which we reviewed abstinence-based religious and cultural revitalization movements within Native American tribes, the rise of nineteenth-century urban missions (e.g., the Salvation Army)(……)

The celebration of multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery is a central tenet of the new addiction recovery advocacy movement. And yet if one listens carefully to the diversity of recovery stories rising from this movement, there is a striking and shared central thread that forms the connecting tissue across secular, spiritual, and religious(……)