When one thinks of the invisibility of addiction recovery, one first thinks of the legions of people in local anonymous and alternative recovery fellowships whose stories rarely penetrate public consciousness. But there is actually a larger population of hidden people who have resolved significant AOD problems in their lives without incorporating addiction and recovery into(……)

A 2015 review of Life in Recovery surveys in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia highlighted 20 conclusions of these surveys and related epidemiologic studies on remission from substance use disorders. The profiled studies confirm substantial recovery prevalence within the general populations, the diversity of people in recovery, the diversity of pathways of(……)

Peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS) have grown exponentially in recent years as an adjunct, and in some cases, an alternative to professionally-directed addiction treatment. P-BRSS are also being integrated within allied human services, primary health care, the child welfare system, the criminal justice system, and managed behavioral healthcare organizations.  Reviews of the research to date(……)

The prevalence, pathways, processes, stages, and styles of long-term addiction recovery for individuals is slowly being revealed through the accumulation of scientific studies, but the parallel processes of family recovery remain in the scientific shadows. An important new study by two UK colleagues seeks to shed light on the recovery experience of addiction-affected families.  Below(……)

Recovery advocates around the country are deeply concerned about what appear to be troubling regressions in U.S. drug policies under the new presidential administration. My concerns, briefly summarized below, expand on a blog I posted earlier this month that generated considerable interest among my readers. When alarm was raised on the 2016 presidential campaign trail(……)

The most famous and controversial treatment for addiction in the 19th century was Dr. Leslie Keeley’s Bichloride of Gold Cure.  Dr. Keeley franchised his cure procedures through more than 120 Keeley Institutes scattered across North America and Europe.  These Institutes became the preferred drying out institutions for the rich and famous in the 1890s.   But(……)

Efforts by professionals to “treat” alcoholism and other addictions have a long and colorful history. Alcoholics have been forced to drink their own urine and forced to drink wine in which an eel had been suffocated. They have been surreptitiously dosed with everything from mole blood to sparrow dung and subjected to the “Swedish treatment”(……)

Recent decades have witnessed calls for the cultural and political mobilization of people in addiction recovery as well as the subsequent rise of a new recovery advocacy movement in the U.S. and internationally. Beyond my efforts to document the history of this movement and to offer broad U.S. policy guidance, I have tried to remain(……)