In 2002, I penned twin essays entitled “ Recovery as a Heroic Journey” and “The Boon of Recovery” that were later included in the book, Let’s Go Make Some History: Chronicles of the New Recovery Advocacy Movement. As an invitation to explore these collected papers, the first of these essays is displayed below. (All proceeds(……)

A regularly resounding theme within the more than 150 blogs that have appeared on this website is that the stories of addiction and their terrible toll are ever present within our culture while the faces and voices of long-term addiction recovery and recovery’s healing effects on individuals, families, and communities have been historically invisible (See(……)

A confluence of historically unprecedented forces has driven addiction-related disease and death into the very heart of rural and frontier communities in the United States. It remains to be seen whether this perfect storm can be met by the development and mobilization of expanded recovery support resources for individuals, families, and communities. Rural and frontier(……)

Successful social movements permeate key areas of cultural life, as is evidenced by the pervasive and enduring influence of the civil rights, women’s, disability, and LGBT rights movements in the United States. The new recovery advocacy movement has similarly sought to extend its influence beyond social policy, addiction treatment, and recovery support service arenas. Like(……)

Recovery from addiction through religious experience has a long history. In 2005, Dr. David Whiters and I published a paper on the historical roots of faith-based recovery in the United States, in which we reviewed abstinence-based religious and cultural revitalization movements within Native American tribes, the rise of nineteenth-century urban missions (e.g., the Salvation Army)(……)

The celebration of multiple pathways and styles of addiction recovery is a central tenet of the new addiction recovery advocacy movement. And yet if one listens carefully to the diversity of recovery stories rising from this movement, there is a striking and shared central thread that forms the connecting tissue across secular, spiritual, and religious(……)

The addiction recovery experience has been sliced and diced in all manner of categories: secular, spiritual, and religious; natural recovery, peer-assisted, and treatment-assisted; and abstinence-based, moderation-based, and medication-assisted, to name just a few.  Recovery achieved through any of these frameworks is often referred to as a pathway of recovery.  The growing consensus that there are(……)

The extension of acute care (AC) models of addiction treatment to models of sustained recovery management (RM) for people with severe, complex, and chronic substance use disorders requires a fundamental redesign of what we have known as the continuum of care. A newly conceived continuum of care would span the stages of precovery, recovery initiation(……)