So it is not our job to pass judgment on who will and will not recover from mental illness and the spirit breaking effects of poverty, stigma, dehumanization, degradation and learned helplessness. Rather, our job is to participate in a conspiracy of hope. It is our job to form a community of hope which surrounds(……)

In a 2009, I co-authored a paper entitled The Recovery Revolution: Will it include children, adolescents, and transition age youth? At that time, a new recovery advocacy movement was maturing, new recovery support institutions were spreading exponentially, and efforts were underway to extend acute care models of addiction treatment to models of sustained recovery management.(……)

In 2002, I penned twin essays entitled “ Recovery as a Heroic Journey” and “The Boon of Recovery” that were later included in the book, Let’s Go Make Some History: Chronicles of the New Recovery Advocacy Movement. As an invitation to explore these collected papers, the first of these essays is displayed below. (All proceeds(……)

Successful social movements permeate key areas of cultural life, as is evidenced by the pervasive and enduring influence of the civil rights, women’s, disability, and LGBT rights movements in the United States. The new recovery advocacy movement has similarly sought to extend its influence beyond social policy, addiction treatment, and recovery support service arenas. Like(……)

There were many policy and service agendas that came out of the 2001 Recovery Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota—the formal launch of the new recovery advocacy movement in the U.S., but none more central than increasing recovery representation at the tables where decisions are made affecting the lives of addicted and recovering individuals and their(……)

We had this vision of empowering young people, of carrying a message of hope, not proposing we have the best way to recover, not endorsing a certain kind of recovery, but just lifting up all these great things that we’d experienced and heard about…Our really big vision is a world where all young people in(……)

Today, large addiction recovery celebration events have become an annual public ritual in many communities. Recovery rallies that a decade ago attracted a few hundred now attract tens of thousands of individuals and families in recovery and their allies. The modern era of mass recovery celebrations (at a public level rather than in closed recovery(……)

  Definition The New Recovery Advocacy Movement (NRAM) is a social movement led by people in addiction recovery and their allies aimed at altering public and professional attitudes toward addiction recovery, promulgating recovery-focused policies and programs, and supporting efforts to break intergenerational cycles of addiction and related problems.    Historical Context The NRAM rose in(……)