In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations. –The Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy That’s all it takes—pressure and time.—Red (Shawshank Redemption) There is a tradition within many Native American tribes of using ancestral history to inform current decision-making and weighing the potential impact of(……)

  I rarely post guest blogs on this website, but occasionally I run across a piece of writing that strikes me as important to share with my readers. The short essay below was written by Erik Haines and offers insight into the growth of the recovery advocacy movement in Canada. It is posted here as(……)

International headlines abound of the harsh drug policies and killing of addicted people in the Philippines, but the prevailing mantra of the international recovery advocacy movement—recovery by any means necessary under any circumstances—is nowhere more evident than in the Philippines. There is, in fact, a rising recovery advocacy movement in the Philippines mobilizing people in recovery,(……)

One of the distinctive features of the recovery advocacy movement is its commitment to transcend the historical barriers that have separated people within the United States and across the world. I have been particularly moved by the growth of recovery community organizations around the globe. In the U.S., early RCOs within African American communities and within(……)

  …a movement is afoot that is seeking to put recovery in the wind so that it can penetrate even the most shadowed corners of the richest and poorest communities. The faces and voices of the individuals and families riding this wind are offering a simple but powerful testimony: “We are the evidence that addiction(……)

Stigma has many targets. It reaches beyond people addicted to various drugs to affect family members and those providing addiction treatment and recovery support services. Such secondary stigma, for example, is the source of the peculiar pecking order within the addictions field through which status (or stigma) is bestowed across varied settings based on one’s(……)

The numbers are eye-opening and heart-breaking: Each year in the United States, there are more than 50,000 drug-related deaths,  88,000 deaths from excessive alcohol use, and more than 480,000 tobacco-related deaths.  (Yes, we still collect these data in separate categories since alcohol and tobacco have historically not been defined as “drugs.”)  Collectively, that is more(……)

I received two emails this week, each posing the question: Are recovery management (RM) and recovery-oriented systems of care (ROSC) dead as organizing frameworks for addiction treatment and recovery support? For 15 years, these conceptual rubrics ascended as promising alternatives to ever-briefer, acute care models of addiction treatment. RM and ROSC were  among the most(……)

Advocacy movements require transforming highly personal stories into the collective narrative of “a people.” Merging the individual stories into a larger collective mosaic allows people with shared characteristics and experiences to see their past and future as part of a larger drama. As Marcus Garvey suggests, individuals become a people only when connected to their(……)

So it is not our job to pass judgment on who will and will not recover from mental illness and the spirit breaking effects of poverty, stigma, dehumanization, degradation and learned helplessness. Rather, our job is to participate in a conspiracy of hope. It is our job to form a community of hope which surrounds(……)